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Clergy sex abuse victims to see Milwaukee archdiocese files


Clergy sex abuse victims to see Milwaukee archdiocese files

Written by M.L. JOHNSON Associated Press Jun. 23, 2013

From the link: http://www.greenbaypressgazette.com/viewart/20130623/GPG0101/306230271/Clergy-sex-abuse-victims-see-Milwaukee-archdiocese-files

MILWAUKEE — The Archdiocese of Milwaukee plans to make dozens of priests’ personnel files public in the next week, along with hundreds of pages of other documents that sex abuse victims hope will hold church leaders accountable for transferring abusive priests to other parishes and concealing their crimes for decades.

The documents are being released as part of a deal reached in federal bankruptcy court between the archdiocese and victims suing it for fraud. The archdiocese has said the records will include personnel files for 42 priests with verified claims of abuse against them, along with depositions from top church officials, including New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who previously led the Milwaukee archdiocese. The documents are to be posted on the archdiocese’s website by July 1.

Similar files made public by other Roman Catholic dioceses and religious orders have detailed how leaders tried to protect the church by shielding priests and not reporting child sex abuse to authorities. The cover-up extended to the top of the Catholic hierarchy. Correspondence obtained by The Associated Press in 2010 showed the future Pope Benedict XVI had resisted pleas in the 1980s to defrock a California priest with a record of molesting children. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger led the Vatican office responsible for disciplining abusive priests before his election as pope.

Archdiocese officials in Milwaukee have long acknowledged that abusive priests were transferred to new churches with no warning to parishioners. Former Archbishop Rembert Weakland publicly apologized to a Sheboygan church for this in 1992, and in a 2008 deposition previously made public, he spoke of multiple cases in which church leaders were aware of priests’ histories but members were not. Still, victims have pushed aggressively for the priests’ files to be released.

Charles Linneman, 45, of Sugar Grove, Ill., said he was an altar boy when he met Franklyn Becker at St. Joseph’s Parish in Lyons in southeastern Wisconsin in 1980 and was abused by him when he visited Becker following the priest’s move to Milwaukee. Linneman read Becker’s file several years ago when it became public during litigation in California, where Becker also served.

Linneman said he had long wondered whether coming forward before he did in 2002 would have kept other children from being hurt. It was a relief, he said, when the file showed no reports of children being abused after him.“It helped me move on,” Linneman said. But it also led him to leave the Catholic church, stunned by what he saw as a massive cover-up.

“I really got fed up,” he said. “I’m like, I just can’t believe all these lies and betrayals that went on. … The archdiocese is supposed to be people in charge that are responsible and morally ethical, and that’s not what they did.”

Becker was removed from the priesthood in 2004. Messages left at a Mayville number listed in his name weren’t returned. His file is among a few from Milwaukee that have already been made public. But Linneman said he still plans to read whatever comes out on July 1 because his attorneys told him the records will likely include some he hasn’t seen.

While certain church officials and attorneys for both sides have seen the roughly 6,000 pages of documents, the victims have not.

Jerry Topczewski, chief of staff for Archbishop Jerome Listecki, said the archdiocese had shared some files with some victims over the years but was reluctant to make them public because of privacy concerns. It eventually agreed to do so when it became clear that victims would hold up the bankruptcy case until the information came out. Some of the files contain graphic material, and people “should be prepared to be shocked,” he said.

At the same time, most of the priests’ names have been known since the archdiocese’s release of 43 with verified abuse claims against them in 2004. Two others, Ronald Engel and Donald Musinski, were added to the list later. The allegations against Musinski came to light only after the archdiocese filed for bankruptcy in 2011 and his file will be released later, once it is complete, Topczewski said. Two other priests’ files aren’t being released because they involve single victims who could easily be identified.

The impact of church documents released elsewhere has varied greatly, said Terry McKiernan, who has spent more than a decade collecting and preserving clergy sex abuse records for BishopAccountability.org. In one of the biggest scandals involving the church, Cardinal Bernard Law resigned as the head of the Boston archdiocese within days of the 2002 release of child sex abuse documents that also described a priest abandoning his adult lover as she overdosed. But in other places, where files were too massive or disorganized for most people to make sense of them, they drew little attention, McKiernan said.Even when victims were successful in bringing the truth to light, some found it didn’t have the result they had hoped. Joelle Casteix, 42, of Newport Beach, Calif., was abused by a teacher at a Catholic high school in the 1980s. Documents in her case were made public in 2005 as part of a $100 million settlement with the Diocese of Orange, an experience she called “life-changing.”

“I got my human dignity back,” she said in an email. “I was able to get truth and power for the first time since I was 16. For years, people thought I was crazy. But now, everyone knows that I was right and truthful all along.”

Yet despite the publicity, her former teacher was able to keep his job at a Michigan college. Officials there see her as a disgruntled ex-girlfriend, Casteix said, adding that the situation “makes me ill.”

5 things to know

How many priests were involved? The Archdiocese of Milwaukee has verified claims of sexual abuse by 45 priests, including 23 who are still alive. None is allowed to work as a priest, and 15 have been officially defrocked. Most of them are accused of abuse that took place before 1990.

How many victims are there? It’s hard to say because some victims may not have come forward. But one former priest, Lawrence Murphy, has been accused of sexually abusing some 200 boys at a school for the deaf from 1950 to 1974. Other priests have been accused by only one person thus far. There are more than 570 sexual abuse claims pending in bankruptcy court, but some of those involve lay people or priests assigned to religious orders, not the archdiocese. Attorneys have not said specifically how many of the 570 claims relate to the 45 priests on the archdiocese’s restricted list.

How did clergy abuse cases end up in bankruptcy court? Abuse victims had long sought to hold the archdiocese accountable, but most didn’t come forward until well into adulthood, when it was too late under Wisconsin law to sue the church for negligence in supervising its priests. A 2007 Wisconsin Supreme Court decision gave them a window, saying the six-year limit in fraud cases didn’t start until the deception was uncovered. The archdiocese filed for bankruptcy in 2011, once it became clear that it could face a slew of lawsuits. It said it wouldn’t have the money to pay if those cases went against it.What’s in the documents the archdiocese is releasing by July 1? It’s hard to say for certain because no one has seen the collection yet except attorneys and certain church leaders. Jerry Topczewski, chief of staff for Archbishop Jerome Listecki, has said it will include the personnel files of 42 priests, depositions of church leaders including New York Cardinal Timothy Dolan, who previously led the Milwaukee archdiocese, and records from the files of bishops and other key figures.

What happens next? The release of the documents has been important to sexual abuse victims, but it does not affect resolution of the bankruptcy case. Topczewski said the next step in that will be for the archdiocese to come up with a reorganization plan detailing how it will provide for victims and pay its expenses in the future. Mike Finnegan, an attorney representing many victims, says one focus for his legal team will be trying to get the archdiocese’s former insurers to cover abuse claims.

Victims of Murphy’s law


Victims of Murphy’s law

Paul Byrnes March 16, 2013

From the link: http://www.watoday.com.au/entertainment/movies/victims-of-murphys-law-20130313-2g0o7.html

Mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa. I am old enough to remember those  words as part of the Latin Mass. I learnt them growing up in the Catholic Church  in Australia. We spoke them to ask forgiveness for our sins. ”Through my fault,  through my fault, through my most grievous fault …”

As I was learning them, the Vatican was receiving the first reports of the  extent of one priest’s sexual abuse of deaf children at St John’s School for the  Deaf in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Father Lawrence Murphy, ordained in 1950, was a  master of American Sign Language, a charismatic personality and a great  fund-raiser. He may also have abused more than 200 deaf children in the three  decades in which he was allowed to remain at St John’s, even after his  activities were reported to the Vatican.

Father Murphy took a holiday in 1958. Father David Walsh came to the school.  Some of the boys told him what Father Murphy was doing. Father Walsh reported  the allegations to Archbishop Meyer of Milwaukee and to the Vatican’s apostolic  delegate in Washington, DC. Walsh never came back. In 1963, Father Murphy was  promoted to head of the school.

This setting gives extra meaning to the title of Silence in the House of  God: Mea Maxima Culpa. Many of these boys arrived at St John’s aged just  four, from families in which they could not easily communicate. Many hearing  parents never learnt to sign.

When the abuse started, Murphy would interpret for the children when they  spoke to their parents.

Interviewed against a black background, victim Terry Kohut, now a teacher in  his 60s, signs with expressive gestures.

”I was afraid to tell my mother because I didn’t think she would believe  me,” he says. ”She would say a priest would never do something like that to  children. I kept it a secret.” On that word, he clenches his fists in front of  his mouth, signing ”secret”.

These interviews, with four of the children  Lawrence Murphy abused, offer a  story of unimaginable sadness. Gradually, their testimony becomes heroic. In  1973, Bob Bolger wrote a letter to Archbishop William Cousins of Milwaukee about  Murphy. Later that year, he and two fellow former pupils, Arthur Budzinski and  Gary Smith, went to the police. The police did not file charges, so these angry  young men made a flyer with Lawrence Murphy’s face and the words ”Most  Wanted”. They passed it out at church.

Murphy was finally removed as director of St John’s a year later after a  staff member threatened to go to the parents. Murphy was allowed to retire to a  family home in another diocese, where he continued to abuse other children. He  died in 1998, still a Catholic priest. He is buried in a Catholic cemetery in  his vestments. A canonical trial, begun in 1997 by the new archbishop of  Milwaukee, was abandoned in 1998 just before Murphy died.

Alex Gibney examines several other cases in this superb documentary. The  director talks to high-profile former priests, who criticise the church’s  response to the tsunami of sexual-abuse cases in the US. Gibney then takes the  allegations to Rome. For 25 years, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger ran the  Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, formerly known as ”the  Inquisition”. Many of these cases went across his desk. After 2001, all cases  concerning a minor went  to him. Most of them were dealt with in secret. Even  when he wanted to investigate, Ratzinger was sometimes blocked by  Pope John  Paul II, a man now on the way to sainthood.

Gibney exposes the same worrying trends that we’ve seen here – disbelief,  followed by leniency towards the abuser and scant concern for the victim.

The film left me sick to my stomach and speechless with anger. I left the church  long ago. If I had still been part of it, this film would have made me leave. As  the cardinals gathered this week to choose a new pope, I wondered how many would  choose to watch it?