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Abuse responsibility not equal: Pell


Abuse responsibility not equal: Pell

Source: AAP
1 MAR 2016 – 5:15 AM  UPDATED 1 MAR 2016 – 12:20 PM
From the Link: http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2016/03/01/abuse-responsibility-not-equal-pell-0
Cardinal George Pell

Cardinal George Pell

In compelling evidence to the child abuse royal commission, George Pell has explained how responsibility for protecting children is shared in the church.

Cardinal George Pell says he had ‘no interest’ in Gerald Francis Ridsdale’s offending in the mid-1970s and was not told the priest was being moved because he was a pedophile

Cardinal Pell, who was then a Ballarat priest, says he did not know that Ridsdale’s offending was common knowledge in the Victorian parish of Inglewood in 1975 and did not know about the allegations.

“It’s a sad story and it wasn’t of much interest to me,” he told the child abuse royal commission from Rome, drawing gasps from some observers in the room.

“The suffering, of course, was real and I very much regret that, but I had no reason to turn my mind to the extent of the evils that Ridsdale had perpetrated.

He was asked if it was not necessary to avoid repeat offences to fully understand the circumstances of cases like Ridsdale.

The cardinal said that everyone in the church approached the task differently according to their level of responsibility.

Ms Furness asked him if he was saying it was not the case that if a parish priest heard of events dangerous to children happening in a neighbouring parish or a distant parish he had no responsibility to the children who were in danger.

Cardinal Pell: “Well, very obviously I said nothing of the sort. I said that a person from a neighbouring parish or distant parish has less responsibility for the care of children in those distant parishes than he does in his own.”

He told commission chair Justice Peter McClellan that he agreed that every member of the church had a responsibility to do what they could to protect children.

He also agreed that office bearers had a greater responsibility.

Cardinal Pell also said that Bishop Ronald Mulkearns lied to him about Ridsdale.

Former Ballarat bishop Ronald Mulkearns knew about complaints against Ridsdale when he moved him between parishes but Cardinal Pell said he was not told about it when he was an adviser to the bishop from 1977.

Cardinal Pell said the bishop and senior cleric Monsignor Leo Fiscalini deceived him and other advisers at meetings which discussed moving Ridsdale.

The commission has heard Ridsdale’s offending was common knowledge in at least two parishes but Cardinal Pell maintained he did not know.

Commission chair Justice Peter McClellan said Cardinal Pell would be held to be culpable if he, like Bishop Mulkearns, did know about the offending.

Cardinal Pell said that was correct.

“It is very clear of course that the decision is one of the bishop’s, that the consultors only have an advisory capacity and of course all of us have to respect the evidence,” Cardinal Pell said.

Pell account unbelievable: Abuse survivors


Pell account unbelievable: Abuse survivors

Source:AAP
1 MAR 2016 – 11:52 AM  UPDATED 1 MAR 2016 – 7:35 PM
From the Link: http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2016/03/01/pell-account-unbelievable-abuse-survivors
Cardinal George Pell says he was unaware of the offending of pedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale in the 1970s but abuse survivors find that hard to believe.
Cardinal George Pell

Cardinal George Pell

Child sex abuse survivors say it’s unbelievable a man of Cardinal George Pell’s intelligence was unaware of a pedophile priest’s offending when two Victorian communities and local clergy knew about it.

The cardinal told the child abuse royal commission on Monday night that while he was on a Ballarat diocese committee that advised on the transfers of priests he was never told of the offending of pedophile priest Gerald Ridsdale in the 1970s.

Australia’s highest-ranking Catholic, now head of the Vatican Treasury, met the pontiff after his initial grilling by the commission and told reporters before resuming his evidence on Tuesday: “I have the full backing of the Pope”.

By videolink from Hotel Quirinale in Rome he told the commission sitting in Sydney that then Ballarat bishop Ronald Mulkearns and his advisor Monsignor Fiscalini had deceived him by not telling him Ridsdale was moved between parishes because of his offending.

Ridsdale was able to continue his offending as he was shifted from one parish to another as “talk” began among parishioners about his interfering with children.

His nephew David Ridsdale, who was sexually abused by his uncle, is among a group of survivors hearing the cardinal’s evidence in Rome and told reporters it appeared the Catholic Church was behaving “with lies and deceit” within its own structure.

He said he assumed Victorian Police would be taking up the matter in relation to church officials moving pedophile priests to parishes where they could continue their offending.

‘We’ve ended up with the ears of the world’: Abuse survivors adamant fight will go on


‘We’ve ended up with the ears of the world’: Abuse survivors adamant fight will go on

Source:AAP
3 MAR 2016 – 3:43 AM  UPDATED 3 MAR 2016 – 8:01 PM
From the Link: http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2016/03/03/weve-ended-ears-world-abuse-survivors-adamant-fight-will-go
Abuse survivors vowed to continue the fight for justice for people who have been sexually abused within the Catholic church, just moments after Cardinal George Pell finished giving evidence to the child abuse royal commission.
Cardinal George Pell

Cardinal George Pell

The abuse survivors who travelled to Rome to hear his evidence spoke to reporters moments after Cardinal Pell completed his final day on the stand in Rome.

David Ridsdale, a victim of pedophile priest, his uncle Gerald Francis Ridsdale, said the fight for justice was far from over.

“We wanted to make sure the commission [for Cardinal Pell] was the same process that we faced when in Australia,” Mr Ridsdale said.

“We feel that has been achieved. But so much more has happened. We’ve ended up with the ears of the world.

“So, please, understand that while we’re fighting one battle in Ballarat, we’re hoping to steamroll a whole deal more, and this is a worldwide institutional problem, not just the Catholic Church, this went on for so long and everybody knew, everybody knew.

“And it is about time that we addressed the past and look forward to the future, and I can assure you that is the goal of all the survivors that you have met.”

‘In the loop’

On his fourth day on the stand in Rome, Cardinal Pell said he would have been aware of concerns raised by parents from the Victorian parish of Doveton in a 1991 letter to the Catholic Education Office that said Searson was going into the boys’ toilets, watching boys in the shower and taking children into the presbytery without permission.

He said he did not investigate the matter because it was the responsibility of the CEO and the Vicar General.

“If they’d asked my opinion I would have given it,” he said.

He agreed that he was “in the loop as far as knowledge of Father Searson being a risk to children” but said the issue was the level of risk and “just what could be done within church and state law”.

The commission also heard that a student at St Patricks College in Ballarat told Cardinal Pell that Brother Edward Dowlan was “misbehaving” with boys in 1974.

Cardinal Pell said the boy “mentioned it casually in conversation” and did not ask him to do anything.

Asked by Commissioner Peter McClellan what he did with the information, Cardinal Pell replied: “I didn’t do anything about it”.

Eventually, he said, he inquired about the matter with the school chaplain but did not go immediately to the school to find out what was going on.

“With the experience of 40 years later, certainly I would agree that I should have done more,” Cardinal Pell said.

Lawyer Peter O’Brien, representing a former student of the Christian Brothers from Ballarat, asked Cardinal Pell “why on earth” he did not mention the complaint to police or insurance companies involved in cases brought against the Christian Brothers about Dowlan since the 1990s.

Cardinal Pell said it was because he had “no idea that the Christian Brothers were covering up in the way in which it’s now apparent”.

Dowlan continued to abuse dozens of children until 1985 but Cardinal Pell said he could not have done something to stop the crimes.

Pell denies offering bribe to keep abuse victim quiet

Earlier in proceedings, Cardinal Pell denied asking a nephew and victim of pedophile priest Gerald Francis Ridsdale what it would take to keep him quiet.

David Ridsdale told the commission when he told Cardinal Pell in 1993 he had been abused by his uncle, the then Melbourne bishop asked him: “I want to know what it will take to keep you quiet.”

Cardinal Pell said he felt sorry for Ridsdale, but repeatedly denied the claim.

Mr Ridsdale’s lawyer Stephen Odgers SC asked: “Was it the case that you didn’t have much interest in what David Ridsdale told you about the crimes of Gerald Ridsdale?”

Cardinal Pell replied: “That’s completely untrue and David has never claimed that.”

Cardinal Pell said there was a radical misunderstanding between himself and Mr Ridsdale over their 1993 telephone conversation.

“I’m not even sure what keeping quiet means,” Pell said.

“I do dispute that.

“But for a man who was expressing a preference for a church hearing rather than going to the police, I wouldn’t have had any dispute with him on that score, although I have never impeded or discouraged anyone from going to the police.”

‘Disastrous coincidence’

Pell said it was a “disastrous coincidence” that five pedophiles ended up at the one Victorian school and parish in the 1970s.

Four pedophile Christian Brothers taught at Ballarat East’s St Alipius Boys’ School and pedophile priest Gerald Francis Ridsdale was the parish priest.

Pell also emphatically denied telling another priest that Fr Gerald Francis Ridsdale was abusing boys.

Former altar boy BWE has testified he overhead Cardinal Pell tell Fr Frank Madden before a funeral in Ballarat in 1983: “Ha, ha, I think Gerry’s been rooting boys again.”

“Let me begin by saying that nearly every detail in this allegation is manifestly false,” Pell said.

Fr Madden has previously told the inquiry Cardinal Pell never said that.

Cardinal Pell also said he deeply regretted the impact the abuse had on survivors’ faith, saying “Of course one of the other things I regret as a Catholic priest is the damage that these crimes do to the faith of the survivors, of the victims and their friends and family and generally throughout the society. I lament that”.

Cardinal Pell told the commission on Wednesday the church in the 1970s and 1980s was a world of crimes and cover ups and he was left in the dark about serious sex abuse allegations against priests and brothers in Ballarat and Melbourne.

Cardinal Pell also said he regretted his choice of words when he told the commission on Tuesday he had no interest in Father Ridsdale’s offending in the mid-1970s.

Cardinal Pell said he completely messed up the sequence of events while giving evidence and had believed he was responding to questions about when he was a Melbourne official in 1993.

 

Pell’s claim he was deceived ‘is wrong’


Pell’s claim he was deceived ‘is wrong’

27 APR 2016 – 6:30PM

From the Link: http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2016/04/27/pells-claim-he-was-deceived-wrong

Cardinal George Pell

Cardinal George Pell

A hearing into abuse in the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne winds up with former education officers expressing anger at Cardinal Pell’s allegations of deceit.

Source:AAP
27 APR 2016 – 6:30 PM  UPDATED YESTERDAY 6:30 PM

Three former Catholic education officers have denied Cardinal George Pell’s claims their office deceived him about the activities of a violent and sexually abusive priest.

Former Catholic Education Office director Monsignor Thomas Doyle and his deputy Peter Annett told the sex abuse royal commission of their shock, disappointment and anger on hearing Dr Pell allege the office withheld information about pedophile priest Peter Searson in the 1980s.

Cardinal Pell, an auxiliary bishop in Melbourne in the ’80s, told the royal commission in March education officials were fearful of telling him the full story about Searson because they knew he would be “decisive” and not accept the status quo.

In giving his evidence from Rome where he is now the Vatican’s finance chief, Dr Pell also said he thought the education office at the time was protecting Archbishop Frank Little.

But Mgr Doyle and other witnesses categorically denied this was the case.

“I don’t agree with that evidence. I don’t agree that the Catholic Education Office intended to deceive Bishop Pell, so I thought his statement was wrong,” the Monsignor told the commission on Wednesday.

He was disappointed with the Cardinal’s claims.

“I don’t think they were true,” he said.

The now retired priest also said the office would have welcomed then Bishop Pell’s assistance in removing Searson.

The commission has heard evidence Searson threatened one little girl by holding a knife to her chest, sexually molested children in confession and threatened people with a gun.

Searson died in 2009 without being charged.

He was suspended from duty in 1997, a year after Dr Pell became Archbishop of Melbourne.

The commission has also heard that Archbishop Little ignored repeated requests to remove Searson.

Mr Annett said on Wednesday at one stage in the late ’80s the number one priority for the office was to get Searson removed from the parish.

“I would have thought our staff would be completely frank with Bishop Pell and be cheering from the rooftops if he was able to take action,” he said.

He said he had to admit to “some shock” at what Dr Pell said in Rome.

“I was disappointed and perhaps angry, but certainly very disappointed,” Mr Annett said.

Mr Annett, Mgr Doyle and former education consultant Allan Dooley said there was never any instruction to keep information from then auxiliary bishop Pell.

A fourth witness, former education official Catherine Briant who in 1989 took over as zone officer with responsibility for Doveton from Mr Dooley, said she was not briefed on problems at the Holy Family school.

She dealt with complaints he was bullying and harassing staff. She had no dealing with Bishop Pell, nor was she ever instructed to keep information from him, she said.

The hearing into widespread clerical abuse in Melbourne, which started last November, concluded on Wednesday.

Can Pope Francis Keep Out Running His Sex Abuse Scandals?


Can Pope Francis Keep Out Running His Sex Abuse Scandals?

Posted on by Betty Clermon

From the Link: https://opentabernacle.wordpress.com/2016/03/20/can-pope-francis-keep-out-running-his-sex-abuse-scandals/

"Saint" Peter Damian

“Saint” Peter Damian

Fr. Alessandro De Rossi, 46, pastor of a parish in Rome, was arrested on Dec. 31, 2014, charged with aggravated sexual abuse. An Argentine judge had issued the international arrest warrant on December 26 and transmitted it to Interpol.

De Rossi, born in Rome and sent to Argentina by Church authorities, was accused specifically with corrupting and sexually abusing minors, and “causing also the practice of group sex,” while he was a missionary in the Province of Salta from 2008 to 2013 working with young drug addicts.

On Dec. 23 and 24, 2014,

Salta police officers carried out several raids to seize computers, photographs and some other information that could be used as evidence of the alleged ties between De Rossi and the sexual abuse cases that had been reported by minors.

Prosecutor Pablo Paz explained to local media that there was enough evidence to charge the priest. Paz explained that he did not only have the depositions from the victims but also e-mails that De Rossi sent to the young man who filed a complaint. According to the prosecutor, De Rossi has to face charges for aggravated sexual abuse.

The Buenos Aires Herald also reported that “Judge Diego Rodríguez Pipino of Salta did not just request that Interpol arrest De Rossi but he also requested the assistance of the Foreign Ministry, the Border Guard, the Federal Police and the Airport Security Police. The Foreign Ministry is expected to play an important role to seek theextradition of the priest.”

The article noted that Italy had recently rejected Argentina’s request for extradition of two men connected to the atrocities committed during that country’s 1976-1983 military dictatorship. One “was charged with the kidnapping and torture of more than 60 people.” He had fled to Italy “trying to take advantage of his dual nationality” and “had taken refuge in a chapel in Genoa.” The other “was said to have witnessed torture in a clandestine detention centre.”

In January 2013, De Rossi had been hospitalized after he said he was attacked by a young man who had asked him for money and food. “I will not return to Italy,” he told a provincial newspaper.

“The priest, who had returned to Rome in early 2013 for health reasons, after spending several years in the mission, was accompanied by a positive assessment by the local bishop. For this reason he had been entrusted the pastoral care of the parish of St. Aloysius Gonzaga in September 2013,” the Diocese of Rome stated after De Rossi’s arrest. The diocese had “full confidence in the Italian judiciary.”

Although one of the pope’s titles is Bishop of Rome, the diocese, or “vicariate,” is administered by a vicar-general appointed by the pope. Cardinal Agostino Vallini was appointed by Pope Benedict XVI and confirmed by Pope Francis.  Archbishop of Salta, Mario Antonio Cargnello, appointed in 1999 by Pope John Paul II, is the “local bishop” referred to in diocese’s statement.

De Rossi was put under house arrest by the Church for only six months after his arrest by civil authorities. Extradition to Argentina was denied on Oct. 11, 2015, by the Court of Appeal of Rome for “lack of serious evidence.” A prosecutor can decide to pursue the case further or close it.

Regardless, since October, De Rossi is a free man and under no ecclesial supervision.

After the priest’s arrest on Dec. 31, 2014, Vatican spokesman Fr. Federito Lombardi had stated, “I do not know anything … It’s something that does not start from the Vatican.”

But it does “start from the Vatican.” The failure of Cardinal Vallini and Archbishop Cargnello to protect children can be directly attributed to Pope Francis’ tolerance of such callousness.

For example, on Feb. 18, 2016, Pope Francis said that “a bishop who moves a priest to another parish when a case of pedophilia is discovered” should “present hisresignation,” announcing to his hierarchs around the world that he will not hold them accountable for endangering children and only in this particular circumstance would they be expected to offer their resignation.

On March 14, Cardinal Angelo Bagnasco, president of the Italian Bishops’ Conference, quoted the pope’s words as justification for maintaining their policy that prelates are not required to report the sex abuse of minors to civil authorities.

Cardinal Paolo Romeo, archbishop of Palermo, Sicily, said it was “not my place”  to report Fr. Roberto Elice for abusing minors. Romeo “knew about the abuse against three children for three years.” On Feb. 2 Italian police arrested Elice who had left the parish “only a few weeks ago” where the abuse took place.

Cardinal Philippe Barbarin, France’s senior Catholic prelate and now the subject of a criminal investigation on charges of failing to report and endangering the lives of others about sexual abuse of minors as required by French law, stated he would not resign.

One of Barbarin’s priests, Fr. Bernard Preynat, was indicted on Jan. 27 for “sexual abuse of minors under 15 years by a person in authority.” In an interview published Feb. 10, Barbarin admitted “having learned the facts in 2007-2008” about Preynat, but promoted him anyway in 2007, keeping him in ministry and in contact with children until he removed him in August 2015.

Pope Francis’ “comment does not in any way target Cardinal Barbarin who quite rightly suspended Father Preynat after meeting a first victim and taking advice from Rome, and this, even before a first official complaint was made,” a source close to the cardinal said.

It was first reported on Feb. 12, “In the coming days, complaints will be filed against [Cardinal Philippe Barbarin, archbishop of Lyon] for failure to report pedophilia.” Preynat’s attorney stated on Feb. 16 “the facts were known by the ecclesiastical authorities since 1991” that his client had sexually abused young scouts between 1986 and 1991.

On March 1, Pope Francis told a delegation Christian social activists, “I receive you because my friend Cardinal Barbarin asked me.”

On March 4, prosecutors announced that “senior Vatican figures” would also be in included in their investigation for “failure to report a crime.” “The Vatican had given Cardinal Barbarin its backing, saying it had confidence he would deal with the matter ‘with great responsibility’ … The implicit support for Barbarin suggests that even pretensions that bishops should follow the law has been abandoned.”

The case has become so notorious that French Prime Minister Manuel Valls urged Barbarin “to take responsibility for his actions” on March 15   Two days later, theFrench state secretary for victims issues, Juliette Meadel, called on Barbarin to resign.

Also on March 17, new accusations were made that Barbarin had also promoted a priest previously convicted for sexually abusing adults in a residential home. Church officials denied the priest had been promoted but admitted he was still employed by the Lyon diocese.

So far, Pope Francis has refused to meet with Preynat’s victims.

 The scandals accumulate around the world. In 2016 alone:

Australian Cardinal George Pell, chosen by Pope Francis as head of all Vatican finance, gave testimony before the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse for four days ending March 3. His testimony was videolinked from a hotel room in Rome because the cardinal claimed he was too ill to travel to Australia.

The subject was what he knew about clerical sex abuse in Ballarat. In Ballarat “we have the highest suicide rate  among men in Australia. We have some of the worst drinking and violence problems. And it all stems from that abuse,” said David Ridsdale, one of the victims. “This is not just a problem in Ballarat or in Australia,” he told the press. “This is a systemic problem throughout all the world.”

Australians were disgusted by Cardinal Pell’s testimony.

“Pell’s testimony was directly contradictory … The pattern in Australia was identical to that in Ireland, Canada and the United States: countries that have also been stunned by the extent of the Church’s crimes, the enthusiasm of the conspiracy to elude authorities and the comparative indifference to victims,” wrote one columnist.

“Cardinal George Pell is finished whatever way you look at it,” wrote a columnist for theSydney Morning Herald. “This royal commission is just one example of light currently being shone, globally, upon the horror.”

“What we now know – more recently through the painful and confronting accounts of victims of crimes and testimonies during the royal commission – is that the sickening crimes of several Catholic priests were ignored by the very establishment which preaches propriety. And what Pell showed this week, was that even after these crimes were exposed for public condemnation, accepting blame by the Church appears to be a very difficult concept,” wrote the political editor of Perth Now Sunday Times. “And yet, he told journalists this week: ‘I have the full backing of the pope.’”

Pope Francis refused to meet with victims who had flown to Rome to witness Pell’s testimony in person.

“The pedophile scandal erupted in Oaxaca shortly before the visit of Pope Francis to Mexico [Feb. 12-18] but the pope did not agree to meet with relatives of the victims in this case nor others that have occurred years ago.” While Pope Francis “blasted the ‘oppression, mistreatment and humiliation’ of indigenous peoples,” the archdiocese was accused of covering up sexual abuse of 100 indigenous children. “Civil organization and relatives of victims accused the archbishop of Oaxaca, Jose Luis Chavez, and the Vatican of concealing evidence of abuse of indigenous children and refusing to listen to the victims.”

Victims’ advocate and former priest, Alberto Athie, pointed out that while the pope chastises others for corruption, “clerical pedophilia should be viewed as systemic like organized crime which stops a criminal in isolation but does not affect the criminal structure.” Athié said that clerical pedophilia has left more than a thousand victims in Mexico and there are at least five archbishops responsible for covering up for pedophile priests: three of the Archdiocese of San Luis Potosi; Cardinal Norberto Rivera of Mexico City and some of his auxiliary bishops, and the Archdiocese of Oaxaca. Pope Francis is aware of several of these cases, Athie said.

Clerical pedophilia continues in the world with Francis,” said Athie. “The pope is very skilled with words and gestures, but changes of substance fail to happen.”

Fr. Joseph Palanivel Jeyapaul was charged in Minnesota with sexually abusing two teenage girls. He fled the US but was arrested by Interpol in 2012 and extradited back to the US where he was convicted last year. “Following a plea deal, Roseau County district court sentenced him to a year in jail but he was released and deported to India in June 2015 on account of time served while awaiting trial.”

In January, the Vatican lifted Jeyapaul’s suspension following a recommendation by an Indian bishop. “We have provided him accommodation but he will not have any active role in the Church,” a spokesman for Diocese of Ooty said. Essentially, Jeyapaul is a free man.

The attorney who represented the girls in Minnesota said, “The Vatican must be held accountable. … This is on the pope.”

Unfortunately for the thousands of future victims of clerical sex abuse, Pope Francis can keep out running his scandals because the US media is the most influential in the world and they continue to lie.  No, the pope DID NOT fire his US ambassador as I will explain in a future report. (For one thing, Archbishop Carlo Maria Viganò passed the mandatory retirement age of hierarchs in January and is still in office. Second, the 3 Vatican reporters who broke the story never mentioned Kim Davis. Third, Vigano considered this post to be “punishment” for honestly reporting Vatican corruption and would be happy to leave.) In addition to his contempt for his Church’s victims of clerical sex abuse, Pope Francis is a misogynist homophobe.

(Betty Clermont is author of The Neo-Catholics: Implementing Christian Nationalism in America.)

(Note to readers: No alternative reporter or blogger would have access to accurate information on the global clerical sex abuse crisis without the Abuse Tracker website, administered by the volunteer talent and hard work of Kathy Shaw. If you’d like to support independent journalism, please visit the website and follow the instructions to donate.)

The girls, the paedophile and Cardinal Pell


The girls, the paedophile and Cardinal Pell

Words: Debi Marshall

From the Link: The girls, the paedophile and Cardinal Pell

Australia’s worst paedophile priest, Father Gerald Ridsdale, once lived with a young clergyman who is now Cardinal George Pell. As the Cardinal prepares to give evidence to the child abuse royal commission, two women break decades of silence to tell Debi Marshall about their ordeal in Ridsdale’s care – and their disappointment with Pell.

Cardinal George Pell

Cardinal George Pell

In 1973, a young Father George Pell, flushed with success from his recent studies in Rome and Oxford, returned to his home town of Ballarat and took up residence in the St Alipius presbytery; a place, it would be publicly revealed more than 20 years later, that was a paedophile’s paradise and a child’s nightmare.

His housemate that year was the tall, rowdy and popular parish priest, Father Gerald Ridsdale. What the parents and parishioners who worshipped God and obeyed the sanctity of the church and its messengers did not know was that from early in his priesthood, Ridsdale was subject to a psychiatric report. He was already a serial child abuser who sodomised children at will, picking them off when and where his desires dictated: in front of a church altar, at the presbytery, or on camping or fishing trips.

When he hurt them, he ignored their cries for him to stop. If they persisted in making a racket, he beat them. Badly.

In May 2015, the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse began an investigation into how Catholic Church authorities dealt with paedophile clergy in Ballarat and the impact of abuse. It heard that the diocese was a hotbed of scandal, cover-ups and paedophilia, and that vulnerable children – particularly orphans – had been prey to abusive clergy.

The hulking figure of Fr Ridsdale had given sermons from the pulpit while secretly running an unsophisticated, but terrifyingly effective paedophile ring. All three of Ridsdale’s Christian Brother cohorts – particularly Brother Robert Best – had also enjoyed uninterrupted access to vulnerable children, whom they handed around to each other to abuse.

“Because I went into care so young and stayed until I was 12, I was known as a “lifer””

Pedophile Priest Father Gerald Risdale

Pedophile Priest Father Gerald Risdale

For Gabbi Short, now 60, growing up at Ballarat’s Nazareth House Girls’ Home, run by the Sisters of Nazareth, was the equivalent of living in hell; a daily battle for survival. The fifth of nine children, Gabbi was placed into care when she was just eight weeks old, at the suggestion of her parents’ local priest.

“Dad was a war veteran who suffered shell-shock and neuroses,” she says. “Mum cared about us, but the way Dad was, she had no choice but to put me and my sister in a home. She had no pension to live on.

“Because I went into care so young and stayed there until I was 12, I was known as a ‘lifer’. Mum made every effort to continue to see me, but the nuns made it clear she wasn’t welcome at Nazareth House and she eventually gave up.”

Gabbi recalls with a shudder the years 1963 and 1964.

“They were just the worst years,” she says. “That was when Father Gerald Ridsdale, who was the chaplain at our school, and Sister Imelda, were there together. It was a nightmare.”

Sr Imelda, a young, attractive nun, was a sadist to children.

“She was in Ridsdale’s thrall,” Gabbi says, ticking off on her fingers some of the brutalities she and other orphans endured.

“She was charming and sycophantic to Ridsdale, but together they brutalised us orphans continually. The sexual and physical assaults that I and the other girls endured between us are too many to list, and they are all graphic and appalling.

“For no apparent reason, Sr Imelda would slam my head up against the wall, which resulted in a hairline fracture of my skull, drag me up the passage by my hair, make me stand in the freezing cold hallway for three hours at a time or get down on my knees and polish the concrete.

“She would belt me for wetting the bed and if we wet ourselves from fear, we had to lick up our own urine.”

“We were his playthings. He’d kick us, belt us, or slam our heads up against walls.”

Ridsdale, whom Gabbi describes as an “arrogant and cruel beast of a man,” also delighted in the abuse.

“He just ran amok,” Gabbi says. “We were his playthings. He’d kick us, belt us, or slam our heads up against walls. He used to belt me around the head with his hand. Maybe they hated themselves and their life – who knows? But we were definitely their scapegoats. There was no escaping the brutality.”

Gabbi developed her own defence mechanism to ward off the sure advances of the paedophiles who worked in or visited Nazareth House.

“After all the abuse I’d endured, I developed such a thing about my body that from the age of 12, no-one would dare touch me,” she says. “Paedophiles are experts at knowing which children to pick on and they didn’t come near me. But not all my friends were as lucky.’

Gabbi recalls that Ridsdale would visit Nazareth House and take girls away as he chose. No-one stopped him.

”One of his favourite girls was Sarah [not her real name], who was in charge of us junior girls,” Gabbi says. “He raped her repeatedly from the age of 10 but when she reported it to a nun, it was ignored.

“Sarah tried to commit suicide by jumping out a second floor window. A nun came in, made all the girls in her dormitory line up at the window so she couldn’t try to jump out again, and belted her within an inch of her life.

“Sarah was so desperate, she just wanted to die. Years later, she accompanied a friend who needed to see a priest for pre-marital counselling. When she entered the room, she found to her horror that the priest was Ridsdale. He recognised her instantly and pulled a photograph of her in her first Communion dress from his top drawer. He had kept it all those years.”

When she heard a baby cry after her excruciating labour, she was told to be quiet.

There are other stories, too, of girls who won’t be identified: the 12-year-old virgin who mysteriously became pregnant at the orphanage and was secretly sent to have her baby at St Joseph’s Babies Home in Broadmeadows. When she heard a baby cry after her excruciating labour and asked if it was her child, she was told to be quiet. She was returned to the orphanage, sans baby, and told to say she had been on holiday.

She doesn’t know who the father of her baby was, but suspects she was drugged and raped, probably by a priest; possibly Ridsdale. It would be 50 years before she would reunite with the son taken from her.

Cossetted from the outside world, with the Catholic mantra of guilt and hell, fire and brimstone to keep them on the straight and narrow, the orphans knew that it was a mortal sin to be molested and that if that happened, they would go straight to hell.

“You need to understand just how isolated and cut off we were behind the walls of that imposing, grandiose orphanage,” Gabbi says.

“We were so vulnerable. On one side of the grounds was a nursing home for the elderly; we were on the other side. We had the same teacher for every subject, so we couldn’t get away from the sadism.

“I didn’t even know the word sex, let alone what it meant.”

“There were about 15 girls in my class. They were all abused.”

At the mercy of the Nazareth nuns who, in turn, did the priests’ bidding, they weren’t taught about sex.

“I didn’t even know the word, let alone what it meant,” Gabbi says.

Gabbi made that special Catholic sacrament, the First Communion, in 1963, aged 7, and saw her mother, very briefly the day before.

“I ran to her and asked her not to go away any more,” she says. “But I never saw her again.” Her mother died in 2003.

Gabbi has a photograph of herself from that day, dressed, as are her fellow students, in a virginal, white, knee-length dress and veil. Standing between them, a vulture amongst his flock, dressed in black robes, his hands piously locked together and wearing an affable smile, is Fr Ridsdale. He had something to smile about: just a week before, he had raped yet another young girl, Julie Braddock. As with the other children he frequently assaulted, he had got away with it.

“In my 40s, I started to talk about what had happened at the orphanage.”

Julie, now 60, has carried the scars of Ridsdale and Imelda’s abuse throughout her life.

“He was the parish priest, so we saw him every day,” she recalls. “Both of them were preparing us for our First Communion; we were learning passages from the Bible. They agreed I needed one-on-one tuition, so I was sent to meet Father in the chapel.”

It started innocently enough: a word of encouragement from Ridsdale, a kiss on the cheek, progressing to him putting his hand up her dress and then his fingers into her vagina.

“I cried, because it hurt,” she grimaces. “I was still crying when I went to see Sr Imelda.”

It was the worst decision she could have made. Imelda beat her, savagely, and locked her under the stairs for three days. Released from the dark, foul-smelling cupboard where she was given only a bucket for her excrement, she was again sent to Ridsdale.

“He said that evil was inside me and he needed to get it out.”

The rape that followed was so brutal that when she cried out in pain, Sr Imelda entered the room and dragged Julie to the bathroom, demanding she take a bath before she was sent to get her toilet bag. Forcing her to lie on the cold lino, Imelda inserted Julie’s soapy toothbrush in her vagina and rectum until she bled. Satisfied that she was clean, Imelda then pronounced that Julie was a filthy girl who must remain silent about what had happened.

Julie was seven and a half years old. Ridsdale would rape her again on at least two occasions.

A week before her First Communion, Julie fainted during rehearsals. Enraged, Ridsdale ordered that she stay behind when the other students left.

“He dragged me out of the church and threw me down the steps.”

“He slammed me so hard in the face that I fell over the church pew and was very badly bruised,” she says, absently drawing a figure-eight with her fingers on her kitchen table.

“Then he dragged me out of the church and threw me down the steps.”

“Nobody gets away with that!” he screamed. Lying whimpering on the ground, she quivered to see Sr Imelda advance toward her, to pick her up. She knew what she was in for.

Like other orphans, Julie, the sixth child in her family, desperately needed loving care – not abuse. Abandoned by their mother when Julie was one month shy of her second birthday, she and her two siblings – one marginally older than herself, one three months of age – were taken into police custody.

Sent to St Joseph’s Babies Home, run by the Sisters of Nazareth, Julie was placed into the Nazareth House Girls Home at the age of five. It was an unwelcome induction.

“Our names were called out and we had to stand in buckets of boiling water.”

“I was shown to my dormitory and told not to wet the bed. The next morning, very early, I was woken and hit on the legs by the nun because I had wet the bed. She rubbed my face into the wet sheet so hard my nose bled. I was then dragged to the bathroom, told to strip in front of the other girls, and beaten along with others who had wet the bed. Later, our names were called out and we had to stand our naked feet in buckets of boiling water.”

The physical abuse was so horrendous, that on occasions Julie would fall unconscious. Sr Imelda was always the most vicious.

“She broke my fingers,” Julie says. “She made me and the other girls eat our own vomit.”

Gabbi and Julie became friends.

“I once tried, with Gabbi, to crawl through a hole in the fence, but a nun kept dragging me back. The wire was embedded in my leg and I needed 11 stitches. I was locked in a cupboard under the stairs for days and nights as punishment. When I was released, I was so ill I had to stay in the sick room for eight days.”

Julie was never told that her real sister, Gail, was at the orphanage, and imagined that Gabbi was her sister.

Julie left the orphanage in 1963 to live with foster parents. But her foster father, too – a pillar of the Polish church and, she believes, part of Ridsdale’s paedophile ring – also abused her; abuse that was so terrible she still can’t speak of it.

“I was locked in a cupboard under the stairs for days and nights.”

In 1968, she became violently ill. Flummoxed as to the cause of her condition, the doctor would later ascertain it was the result of Ridsdale’s abuse and the injuries she sustained at her First Communion rehearsal. Julie’s spleen, one kidney and her appendix were removed.

To escape the hell of life at home, in 1972, aged 16, Julie left home and later married a boy she liked, but didn’t love. The marriage didn’t last, but depression, which has dogged her all her life, did. Four serious suicide attempts ended with hospitalisation, but she eventually found love, married, had seven children and gained a teachers degree. Her beloved husband died in 2005, as did her foster mother, who had left her husband immediately when Julie finally told her of the abuse.

Gabbi left the orphanage in 1968. Moving through a succession of other Catholic homes, including the Winlaton Youth Training Centre – “virtually a prison” – she slept rough on the streets. The terror and trauma she suffered as a child haunted her in her 20s, when her body turned in on itself.

“I was in shock and went down to 30kg,” Gabbi says. “I was dying inside.”

Determined to get stronger, she found work, married and had three children. The marriage didn’t last, but what has lasted is her commitment to ensuring others did not go through what she experienced.

“In my 40s, I started to talk about what had happened at the orphanage,” Gabbi says. “I started to heal and I haven’t stopped talking about it since.”

“I could move on with my life but I’ve chosen to speak out for vulnerable children.”

Now a spokesperson for Forgotten Australians and a relentlessly outspoken critic of the malevolent evil that was allowed to flourish in Ballarat – and elsewhere Ridsdale and his companions lived and worked – Gabbi says she will not rest until these paedophiles and malicious nuns are fully exposed.

“I could move on with my life and put this behind me,” she says, “but I’ve chosen to speak out for vulnerable children who can’t speak for themselves. We need to look out for kids today because no-one looked after the kids of yesterday. We were just open slather.”

THE LAW EVENTUALLY CAUGHT UP WITH RISDALE AND HIS PAEDOPHILE COHORTS, BUT TOO LATE TO SAVE MORE THAN 30 BOYS, WHO CHOSE TO END THEIR OWN LIVES RATHER THAN RELIVE THE ONGOING NIGHTMARE OF THE SADISTIC SEXUAL, PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL ABUSES INFLICTED ON THEM BY THESE SO-CALLED MEN OF THE CLOTH.

The law eventually caught up with Ridsdale and his paedophile cohorts, but too late to save more than 30 boys, who chose to end their own lives rather than relive the ongoing nightmare of the sadistic sexual, physical and emotional abuses inflicted on them by these so-called men of the cloth.

For Ridsdale, the dominos started falling when, in 1992, one of his male victims contacted a hotline regarding paedophile priests. When the police came calling, he could no longer hide behind his cassock, clerical collar and cross. He went quietly.

Pell welcomed the announcement of the Royal Commission, but his welcome soured in public opinion when he added that priests who hear confessions from people who commit child sex abuse must remain bound by the Seal of Confession (the duty of Catholic priests not to disclose what is heard), which he described as ‘inviolable’.

Later, addressing intense questioning at the Royal Commission about what he knew, Pell (by then a Cardinal in Rome and one of the Vatican’s most powerful figures) said he had noticed nothing.

“[Ridsdale] concealed his crimes from me and other priests in Ballarat, from parishioners and from his own family,” he asserted grimly.

Pell’s decision to walk with this vilified priest would prove to be a PR disaster.

Victims, police and the media, were outraged. Not only had Pell shared a house with Ridsdale in 1973, he had chosen to walk side byside with him into court in 1993, when Ridsdale pleaded guilty to 30 counts of indecent assault against nine boys, aged 12 to 16, between 1974 and 1980, for which he received his first, 12 month sentence.

Both had cut an odd figure: Pell, then an ambitious auxiliary Bishop in colourless priestly robes, and Ridsdale, sporting a garish white suit and hiding behind oversized sunglasses. Pell’s decision to walk with this vilified priest would prove to be a PR disaster.

In 1994, Pell had allegedly responded to child abuse victim Timothy Green that he not be ‘ridiculous’ when Green told him that Ridsdale’s friend, Brother Edward Dowlan, was abusing children at St Patrick’s College. Pell has insisted he has no recollection of such a conversation. He was present at a 1982 meeting of the College of Consultors, which discussed unseating Ridsdale from the Mortlake Parish to a Catholic centre in Sydney.

Risdale was convicted of 54 child sexual abuse and indecent assault charges.

By 1993, Ridsdale’s days of being protected were numbered and a flood of victims would continue to come forward. Between 1993 and 2013 he was convicted of 54 child sexual abuse and indecent assault charges against children aged as young as four.

“The vast majority of those were boys,” Gabbi says. “But we know there are girls for which he hasn’t been charged and that the figure is higher – much higher – than 54. Hopefully his past will catch up with him before he is eligible for parole again in 2019. Or before he goes to meet his Maker, in whose image he had represented himself.”

A slim, intense woman with a ready smile, who speaks in an urgent torrent of words, Gabbi cannot hide her disgust that Pell consistently claims he did not see or hear anything.

“How could he not have heard the relentless rumours or the parishioners’ complaints?” she asks, incredulous.

“How could he not have seen the stricken faces of the children when they left Ridsdale’s company? Even Ridsdale’s nephew, David, who was sexually abused by him for five years from the age of 11, claimed to have told Pell about the abuse. He says that Pell’s response was to offer him a financial bribe to keep quiet. Pell, of course, dismissed David’s claim by responding that ‘An offer of help is not the same as a bribe.’ It all just beggars belief.”

At the Royal Commission, Pell said that at no time had he attempted to bribe David or his family, nor did he offer any financial inducements for him to be silent.

And throughout the storms, Pell stood resolute. Paedophilia “was always regarded as being totally reprehensible,” he intoned.

This is probably my last chance to tell my story.”

In 2007, Gabbi and Julie, who had not seen each other for 44 years, met again at a Nazareth House reunion. They have remained friends. Gabbi exhorted Julie to tell her story, but shame and humiliation linger like shadows. She is now very ill.

“This is probably my last chance to tell my story,” she says. “I was stripped of everything I was and everything I am, just as the other 500,000 Australian orphans were. I didn’t know I had siblings until I was 25.

“It matters that I, and other orphans, called out for help and were ignored. Imelda is dead, Ridsdale in prison, but it still matters. It matters. We need justice.”

Julie, too, questions why Pell supported Ridsdale and not the victims. Like other child abuse victims, she is disgusted and outraged that Pell has cited ill health as his reason for not returning to Australia to face the Royal Commission – offering instead to appear by video link.

“If he’s well enough to run the Vatican’s finances,” she spits, “he’s well enough to come home and be counted.”

Julie, who gave evidence before the Royal Commission, is adamant that history must not repeat.

“We are only weeks away from the next sitting of the Royal Commission in Ballarat,” she says. “I want the church to stop hiding what happened. It needs to stop trying to write its own script to take away who we, as victims, are.”

“If Risdale had been stopped in the 1960’s, he wouldn’t have gone on to rape so many.”

She has a special message for Ridsdale and others she believes have turned a blind eye: “Stop protecting each other. You need to go to the next life with honesty and give us victims some peace.”

Gabbi agrees.

“The tragic reality is that if Ridsdale had been stopped in the 1960s, when there were so many warnings about his disgusting behaviour, he wouldn’t have gone on to rape so many boys – a slew of whom later took their own lives – or girls,” she says.

“History could be so very different if those men of the church hadn’t lied and covered up for him and others. This story is just the tip of the iceberg. Nazareth House and the Catholic Church need prosecuting, as do any nuns still alive who abused us. Ridsdale needs prosecuting for what he did to us.

“The question is now: who was protecting Ridsdale? Let’s throw the book at those people.”

Sexual Assault Counselling Australia provides counselling for people who want to address their trauma as a result of hearing about the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse. Call 1800 211 028.

The National Sexual Assault, Domestic and Family Violence Counselling Service 1800RESPECT also offers counselling on 1800 737 732 and at https://www.1800respect.org.au/

Winner of the 2015 Walkley award for Journalistic Leadership, Debi Marshall is an associate producer with Seven’s Sunday Night and author of numerous crime books.

 

 

Bishop Ronald Mulkearns admits not dealing with pedophile priests properly and wanting to protect church’s reputation


Bishop Ronald Mulkearns admits not dealing with pedophile priests properly and wanting to protect church’s reputation

February 24, 2016 10:30pm

Christian Brother authorised funding for private investigator to track down abuse victims, child sex abuse hearing told


Christian Brother authorised funding for private investigator to track down abuse victims, child sex abuse hearing told

Posted February 24, 2016 17:05:0

From the Link: Christian Brother authorised funding for private investigator to track down abuse victims, child sex abuse hearing told

A senior Christian Brother authorised spending on a private investigator to track down victims of notorious paedophile Brother Edward Dowlan, the royal commission into child sexual abuse has heard.

Brother Brian Brandon was a provincial council member of St Patrick’s province of the Christian Brothers, which covered Victoria and Tasmania, between 1984 and 1996.

Since 1993, he has dealt with sex abuse claims brought against the Christian Brothers as part of his role with the order’s Professional Standards Board.

Testifying before the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse in Ballarat, he revealed the tactics engaged by the Christian Brothers to bully people who took sex abuse claims to police.

In 1995, he authorised spending on a private investigator who was targeting victims of Brother Edward Dowlan, who is now in jail for molesting dozens of boys.

In a letter, the investigator, Glynis McNeight, reported back to Dowlan’s lawyers, saying one of her employees tracked down a victim and confronted him about the allegations, adding the victim began to cry.

“As a witness, his credibility can be very easily destroyed as he has had enormous emotional problems all his life,” she wrote to the order’s legal team.

“He’s a very nervous, excitable type who will reduce to tears and bad language easily.”

Brother Brandon gave evidence he was opposed to the strategy of using a private investigator, however he would not answer direct questions put to him about whether he instructed the lawyers to use that strategy in the first place.

“I said if that’s what it will cost, I’m prepared to pay for that. I said we’d pay for it,” he said.

Brother Brandon said the tactic was used on one other occasion.

“I was not happy with the way victims, survivors, were put under stress in this process,” he said.

“I’m sorry this strategy was adopted even though I wasn’t the source of the strategy being adopted.”

Bishop unlikely to remember abuse cases: friend

Bishop Ronald Mulkearns was in charge of the Ballarat diocese when several paedophile priests were moved from parish to parish abusing children.

He has previously been found to be too sick to give testimony but on Thursday is expected to give evidence to the royal commission through a video link.

One of his childhood friends Eileen Piper doubts he will be up to the task.

“I’m only hoping that when he goes into the stand he might, he might remember. I wouldn’t be very confident,” she said.