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L.A. Archdiocese to pay $10 million to 4 alleged abuse victims


L.A. Archdiocese to pay $10 million to 4 alleged abuse victims

By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times March 12, 2013, 7:06 p.m.

From the link: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-0313-archdiocese-settlement-20130313,0,1962671.story

The agreement settles four suits against the archdiocese concerning Michael Baker, who authorities believe molested 23 boys over three decades as a parish priest.

The Archdiocese of Los Angeles has agreed to pay nearly $10 million to four men who say they were molested by one of the region’s most notorious pedophile priests.

The agreement brings to an end four lawsuits against the archdiocese involving Michael Baker, a charismatic parish priest accused of molesting at least 23 boys over three decades.

The church has settled numerous cases brought by Baker’s alleged victims in the past, but the $9.9-million settlement announced Tuesday is the first settlement since the January release of 12,000 pages of internal archdiocese records about abuse. Many of those documents detailed Cardinal Roger Mahony’s dealings with Baker.

The priest admitted his abuse of two boys to the then-archbishop during a 1986 retreat. Mahony sent Baker to a New Mexico treatment center but later returned him to the ministry, and Baker molested again. In 2007, he was convicted of abusing two boys and sent to prison.

Two of the civil cases settled were set for trial next month. Vince Finaldi, a lawyer for the alleged victims, said he believed the file release “played heavily” into the archdiocese’s decision to settle the cases.

“Once we got the files, it confirmed everything we had argued for years and years,” Finaldi said. “Cardinal Mahony’s fingerprints were all over the case.”

A lawyer for the archdiocese said the church was committed to compensating people hurt by Baker, and the negotiations were “just a matter of reaching a reasonable number.”

“We’ve taken responsibility for Michael Baker, whatever he did and for whomever he did it to,” said attorney J. Michael Hennigan.

A lawyer for Baker, who was defrocked in 2000, did not respond to messages seeking comment. Baker was released from prison in 2011 and lives in Costa Mesa. Baker is not required to pay anything under the terms of the settlement, Finaldi said.

The men who settled the suits range in age from 24 to 54. Two are brothers of a third man whom Baker was convicted of molesting. That third brother previously received a $2-million settlement. Under a distribution agreement determined by a judge, his brothers will receive $4 million each for abuse that they said they suffered in the mid-1990s.

A man who alleged that Baker abused him in 1974 and another who said the priest victimized him in the mid-1980s each received nearly $1 million.

Archdiocese wants upcoming sex abuse trials moved far from L.A.


Archdiocese wants upcoming sex abuse trials moved far from L.A.

By Harriet Ryan and Victoria Kim, Los Angeles Times March 15, 2013, 5:27 p.m.

From the link: http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-church-lawsuits-20130316,0,863542.story

Church asks L.A. County judge to delay the trials or move them to San Luis Obispo County because it doesn’t believe a fair, impartial jury can be found locally.

In an acknowledgment that new revelations in the priest abuse scandal have tarnished the church’s image, lawyers for the Archdiocese of Los Angeles are seeking to postpone upcoming sexual abuse trials or relocate them to a courthouse 200 miles away because they don’t believe they can get a fair trial in Southern California.

The church’s request to a judge for a delay or change of venue in pending cases this week came just hours after the announcement that the archdiocese would pay two brothers an unprecedented $4 million each to avoid a molestation trial set for April. The payouts to the men, part of a $10-million deal ending four lawsuits, dwarfed settlements the church paid victims in recent years and underscored the archdiocese’s reluctance to face juries in its own backyard.

“We think that the environment in Los Angeles today is currently hostile,” archdiocese lawyer J. Michael Hennigan said.

The January release of personnel files showing that church hierarchy in the 1980s and 1990s shielded abuser priests from police refocused public attention on the clergy sex scandal. In court papers, archdiocese attorneys blamed media coverage, which they described as “unrelenting obloquy, condemnation and contempt,” for poisoning the potential jury pool.

The church proposed to Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Emilie H. Elias on Tuesday that four suits concerning a Mexican priest accused of abusing more than two dozen boys in L.A. be moved to San Luis Obispo County. In the alternative, the church asked for a trial delay of at least six months to allow what Hennigan called a “cooling-off period.”

The archdiocese bolstered its request to the judge with a report from a jury consultant describing “an intense level of vitriol” in the region toward the former archbishop, Cardinal Roger Mahony, and the church.

Donald Vinson, who worked on the O.J. Simpson and Oklahoma City bombing trials, did not survey potential jurors but said that based on a review of media reports and Google search trends, “the defendants in this matter will not be able to obtain a fair and impartial jury trial in any venue within the Los Angeles media market.”

He said the coverage had turned “passive consumers” of news to “active investigators of the issues” and cited caustic, offensive online comments about Mahony on KTLA’s website.

Changes of venue in civil trials are highly unusual and Richard Gabriel, a jury consultant who has worked for many parties seeking to relocate cases, said the archdiocese’s request was a long shot. Child molestation cases “engender very high emotions and very strong feelings,” he said, but judges are “very stringent” in evaluating whether moving trials is really necessary.

“When you have a metropolitan area of 8 to 10 million people, it’s pretty hard to say that out of that many, you can’t find a fair and impartial jury,” Gabriel said.

The archdiocese has always settled abuse cases before trial, but the possibility of making plaintiffs prove their claims in the unpredictable setting of a trial has been a negotiating point for church lawyers as they try to drive down the amount of settlements.

The change of venue request this week was an acknowledgment that the archdiocese believed it no longer had the option of going to trial in L.A. Hennigan, who as the archdiocese’s lead litigator has overseen two massive settlements totaling $720 million and dozens of smaller payouts, said he had no confidence in local juries given the “media frenzy about the events happening 20-plus years ago.”

“It is not likely that there is anyone who has not been affected” by the publicity, Hennigan said.

The $4-million settlements to two brothers seemed to reflect a changing landscape. The priest accused by the men, Michael Baker, is suspected of molesting at least 23 minors and was convicted criminally of abusing two boys. He admitted molesting youths in a private conversation with Mahony in 1986. Mahony sent him for treatment but returned him to ministry and Baker molested again.

When the brothers initially filed their case in 2011, the church expressed strong doubts about the validity of their claim. A third, older brother received a $2.2-million settlement from the church the previous year for molestation by Baker and archdiocese attorneys suggested the subsequent suit was a money grab.

“Each has previously denied that any abuse occurred at all…. Neither came forward until after their brother received a multimillion-dollar settlement,” church lawyers wrote.

Baker admitted molesting the older brother of the men suing him but told sheriff’s detectives he never touched them and volunteered to take a polygraph. Prosecutors declined to file charges.

Attorneys for the men said the church’s tone changed after Baker’s personnel file was made public in January. The documents revealed that one of Mahony’s top aides, Thomas J. Curry, suggested strategies for keeping police from investigating Baker, including preventing him from seeing certain therapists because they were required to report him to police.

“We did not believe they were serious about settling the cases until the documents came out,” said John Manly, an attorney for the men.

With the church ready to pay, the question became how much. The church paid an average of $1.3 million per individual in its 2007 settlement with hundreds of victims. In recent years, with suits facing tougher standards for statute of limitations, the church paid far smaller sums. In 2011, for example, it settled seven claims for an average of $83,000 per person.

The church’s insurers, which paid a chunk of the $660-million settlement six years ago, are long out of the picture — all payments now come directly from church coffers. The archdiocese said in a recent financial report that it was considering a $200-million fundraising campaign to repay loans it took out in past years to cover sex abuse payouts.

The archdiocese ultimately agreed to pay $9.9 million to the brothers and two other men who said Baker abused them. A judge apportioned the settlement. Two of the men, who alleged that they were molested before Mahony learned of Baker’s history of abuse, got just under $1 million each, and the brothers, who said they were abused in the 1990s after the cardinal was warned, split $8 million.

Hennigan said the size of the settlement had to do with a changed “public attitude” toward the church as well as the notoriety and severity of Baker’s case.

“Michael Baker is our poster boy for misconduct,” he said.

Twelve other sex abuse lawsuits remain pending against the archdiocese, Hennigan said, including the four cases the church is trying to get moved to San Luis Obispo County. Those claims concern another allegedly prolific pedophile priest whose personnel file provides damaging evidence against the archdiocese. Authorities suspect that Nicholas Aguilar Rivera, a visiting priest from Tehuacan, Mexico, molested at least 26 children during nine months in Los Angeles in 1987 and 1988. After parents contacted the archdiocese, Curry warned him of a police investigation and the priest left the country. He remains a fugitive.

Los Angeles archdiocese settles 4 sex abuse cases for $10M


Los Angeles archdiocese settles 4 sex abuse cases for $10M

From the link: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/03/12/los-angeles-archdiocese-settles-4-sex-abuse-cases-for-10m/

LOS ANGELES –  The Roman Catholic  Archdiocese of Los Angeles will pay nearly $10 million to settle four cases  alleging abuse by a now-defrocked priest who told Cardinal Roger Mahony nearly  30 years ago he had molested children, attorneys confirmed on Tuesday.

The cases involving ex-priest Michael Baker span 26 years from 1974 to 2000.  Two were set for trial next month. A judge had said attorneys for the plaintiffs  could pursue punitive damages at trial.

The cases were settled this week.

Two of the claims named Mahony and alleged he didn’t do enough to stop Baker  from abusing children, said plaintiff’s attorney John Manly.

Mahony retired as Los Angeles archbishop in 2011 and was rebuked by his  successor, Archbishop Jose Gomez, last month after confidential church files  showed the cardinal worked behind the scenes to shield molesting priests and  protect the church from scandal.

Mahony, who is in Rome helping select the next pope, was aware of the  settlement, said J. Michael Hennigan, an archdiocese attorney.

“We have for a long, long time said that we made serious mistakes with  Michael Baker and we had always taken the position in these cases that whatever  Baker did we were responsible for,” he said. “That was never an issue.”

Baker could not be reached for comment.

Two of the plaintiffs, a pair of brothers, will get $4 million each, and the  two others will get nearly $1 million each, Manly said.

Confidential files show that Baker met with Mahony in 1986 and confessed to  molesting two boys over a nearly seven-year period.

Mahony removed Baker from ministry and sent him for psychological treatment,  but the priest returned to ministry the following year with a doctor’s  recommendation that he be defrocked immediately if he spent any time with  minors.

Despite several documented instances of being alone with boys, the priest  wasn’t removed from ministry until 2000 after serving in nine parishes.

Baker was convicted of child molestation in 2007 and paroled in 2011.

“The person who could have stopped this in its tracks and prevented three out  of four of these children from being sexually assaulted is now sitting in Rome  voting for the next vicar of Christ,” said Manly. “I find that terribly  troubling.”

Mahony has apologized repeatedly for his handling of clergy abuse cases. The  cardinal was sequestered for the papal conclave and could not be reached for  comment Tuesday.

The archdiocese settled more than 500 clergy abuse lawsuits in 2007 for a  record-breaking $660 million.

Baker was charged in 2002 with 34 counts of molestation involving six  victims, but those charges were dismissed because they fell outside the criminal  statute of limitations.